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Blood Borne Pathogen

Post Exposure Prophylaxis

The PEPline – National Clinicians’ Post-Exposure Prophylaxis Hotline is an excellent resource:  http://www.nccc.ucsf.edu/about_nccc/pepline/

The PEPLine Guidance Publications: A Quick Guide to Assist in Urgent Decision-Making for Occupational Exposures to HIV and Hepatitis B, and C

The PEPline Guide provides expert guidance in managing healthcare worker exposures to HIV and Hepatitis B and C. Callers receive immediate post-exposure prophylaxis recommendations. Available 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. EST every day. For urgent help, call the PEPline or access the following: PEPline Guidance: A quick guide to assist in urgent decision-making for occupational exposures.

For additional information, please see the CDC Guidelines for Occupational Post-Exposure Prophylaxis.


Clinical Information

Want to improve your splinting technique? Here are four tips in #PAWeek video: http://bit.ly/o0wjLY
www.orthoedu.com

 

CNE’s FREE:

Free AAOHN webinar on successful member meetings.

https://www.aaohn.org/upcoming-webinars/live-webinar—successful-member-meetings-if-you-build-them-they-will-come.html

 

FREE: Introduction to Nanomaterials and Occupational Health Course address issues that may arise in the nanomaterial workplace by providing a comprehensive review of current knowledge, frameworks for risk management, and tools for keeping up with the rapidly expanding knowledge base on nanomaterials’ health and safety impacts. http://www.goodnanoguide.org/Short+Courses

 

Free: Viral Hepatitis Serology Training

Continuing Education Credits (CME & CNE) have been renewed for this online training from CDC. This course is comprised of six animated tutorials and eight case studies. This training will help participants to understand the different serologic tests, serological diagnosis, and the meaning of serologic markers and interpret serologic test results. http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/Resources/Professionals/Training/SerologyStart.htm

 

New trainings available at KnowHepatitis.org

Six new free training webinars for frontline workers are now available on demand!
http://www.knowhepatitis.org/

 

Free: Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

This online, on-demand course recognizes the role professionals play in educating and caring for patients with asthma. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. 7 CE credits by ANCC http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm

 

 

Free: Immunization of Health-Care Personnel: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

updates on previously published summary of recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) for vaccinating health-care personnel (HCP) in the United States. 

This report summarizes all current ACIP recommendations for vaccination of HCP and does not contain any new recommendations or policies. The recommendations provided in this report apply, but are not limited, to HCP in acute-care hospitals; long-term-care facilities (e.g., nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities); physician’s offices; rehabilitation centers; urgent care centers, and outpatient clinics as well as to persons who provide home health care and emergency medical services.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr6007.pdf?source=govdelivery

 

FREE: ONLINE COURSE ON VACCINE SAFETY AND PATIENT COMMUNICATION http://www.anaimmunize.org/Webcast

 

 

Free: Ma Nurses Assoc has free CE programs available to all.

These include Workplace Violence, Fragrance Free Latex Allergy Program, Fatigue and Sleeplessness and Work-Related Asthma

http://www.massnurses.org/nursing-resources/continuing-education/mna-ce-online

 

CPR:

AHA Hands Only CPR video to disco music. Great learning tool. Ken Jeong suits up in new Stayin’ Alive video to promote Hands-Only CPR.

http://bit.ly/AHACrowdRise

 

Diabetes:

The American Diabetes Association has developed a number of educational tools and resources that can help you and your patients be successful:

www.diabetes.org

 

DOT Exams:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Medical Examiner Handbook

http://nrcme.fmcsa.dot.gov/mehandbook/MEhandbook.aspx

This is from the DOT: Even if you do not do DOT physicals it has a lot of great info on fitness for duty.

http://transit-safety.fta.dot.gov/publications/substance/RxOTC/RxOTC_April2011.pdf

 

Drug Testing:

HOW STATE MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAWS AFFECT WORKPLACE DRUG TESTING (Occupational Health & Safety, April 2006) See: http://www.civilliberties.org/mmarworkplace.html

 

Epi Pen Training:

Administration of Epinephrine Auto-injectors

Training standards for the administration of epinephrine auto-injectors in accordance with Education Code Section 49414.http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/he/hn/epiadmin.asp

 

Ergonomic Info:

Laboratory Ergonomics: Great ergonomic tips for people who work in Labs.

http://ergonomics.ucla.edu/lab.html

http://www-ehs.ucsd.edu/ergo/training/labergo/ErgoLabSlide1.htm

Ergonomics guidelines for a variety of industries. Links to these guidelines by industry sector.

http://www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Topics/Ergonomics/IndGuide/default.asp

 

Fitness For Duty:

This is from the DOT: Even if you do not do DOT physicals it has a lot of great info on fitness for duty.

http://transit-safety.fta.dot.gov/publications/substance/RxOTC/RxOTC_April2011.pdf

 

Flu info:

Before you order your flu vaccine follow

Checklist for Safe Vaccine Storage and Handling

http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3035.pdf

 

 

Is it a Cold or Flu Poster. This is a pretty good poster

http://images.mooremedical.com/webmail2/cold_or_flu_poster.pdf

 

Toolkit: Teaching Children about the Flu: lesson plans and activities for child care and early childhood programs
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/business/TeachingChildernFlu.pdf

 

Dodge the cold and flu germs this winter – try this fun science experiment to show your kids the importance of proper hand washing: www.schoolfamily.com/handwashing

http://www.schoolfamily.com/school-family-articles/article/6066-show-kids-why-washing-hands-is-important

 

Fun Flu stuff:

UMass Flash mob of clinicians raising awareness for flu shots

http://www.necn.com/09/21/11/Flash-mob-of-clinicians-raising-awarenes/landing_health.html?blockID=565667&feedID=4210

Flu fighter campaign on you tube.
http://www.youtube.com/northshoremedcenter#p/u/0/LC_wd4xe-Gk

 

Hospital/Healthcare Related:

Work Precautions for Handling Hazardous Drugs Highlighted by NIOSH, OSHA, Joint Commission.

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/upd-04-08-11.html

 

NIOSH booklet on Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers.

Statistics, hazards & prevention strategies

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2011-123/pdfs/2011-123.pdf

OSHA has produced a training video for healthcare employers and workers that explains the proper use of respirators and the procedures to follow to assure that respirators protect workers from airborne hazards in healthcare settings. The 33-minute video explains the major components of a respiratory protection program including fit-testing, medical evaluations, training and maintenance. The video also discusses the difference between respirators and surgical masks, features a segment on common respiratory hazards found in healthcare settings, and demonstrates how respirator use helps protect workers from exposure to airborne chemicals.

http://www.dol.gov/dol/media/webcast/20110112-respirators/

 

Laboratories:

Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories

http://www.cdc.gov/biosafety/publications/bmbl5/

Education materials on protecting workers from Hazards found in labs.

www.osha.gov/SLTC/laboratories/index.html

Laboratory Ergonomics: Great ergonomic tips for people who work in Labs.

http://ergonomics.ucla.edu/lab.html

http://www-ehs.ucsd.edu/ergo/training/labergo/ErgoLabSlide1.htm

 

Muscloskeletal:

Experts Offer Tips on Avoiding iPad-Linked Shoulder, Neck Strain

http://www.healthfinder.gov/news/newsstory.aspx?Docid=661170&source=govdelivery

Want to improve your splinting technique? Here are four tips in #PAWeek video: http://bit.ly/o0wjLY
www.orthoedu.com

 

Norovirus:

Norovirus Info:

We are at the peak of the norovirus season. Norovirus continues to be the most common cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in the U.S. with the majority occurring in healthcare settings, including long-term care facilities and acute care hospitals. Recently, CDC published new guidelines for the prevention and management of norovirus outbreaks. Today, we’re pleased to share with you a new norovirus toolkit that complements these guidelines and is designed to assist healthcare facilities prevent the spread of norovirus infections. http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/gastro/norovirus.htm

 

Nutrition:

The new MyPlate food icon from USDA is available in Spanish & English. Download free graphics: http://goo.gl/sMEUI

 

OSHA Info:

OSHA launches interactive web tool to help users determine whether injuries and illnesses are work-related and recordable under the OSHA Recordkeeping rules. http://www.dol.gov/elaws/OSHARecordkeeping.htm

Small Entity Compliance Guide for the Respiratory Protection Standard osha 3384-09 2011. You can order up to 5 copies at http://www.osha.gov/pls/publications/publication.html – type 3384 into the search space

Work Precautions for Handling Hazardous Drugs Highlighted by NIOSH, OSHA, Joint Commission. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/upd-04-08-11.html

OSHA has produced a training video for healthcare employers and workers that explains the proper use of respirators and the procedures to follow to assure that respirators protect workers from airborne hazards in healthcare settings. The 33-minute video explains the major components of a respiratory protection program including fit-testing, medical evaluations, training and maintenance. The video also discusses the difference between respirators and surgical masks, features a segment on common respiratory hazards found in healthcare settings, and demonstrates how respirator use helps protect workers from exposure to airborne chemicals.

http://www.dol.gov/dol/media/webcast/20110112-respirators/

 

Respiratory Protection:

Get Valid Spirometry Results EVERY Time

NIOSH has a poster that provides information on how to identify and correct technical and equipment errors encountered during spirometry testing,

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2011-135/

OSHA has released 9 videos in English and in Spanish at:

http://www.osha.gov/video/respiratory_protection/index.html

Respiratory Protection in General Industry

Respiratory Protection in Construction

Respirator Types

Respirator Fit Testing

Maintenance and Care of Respirators

Medical Evaluations for Workers Who Use Respirators

Respiratory Protection Training Requirements

Voluntary Use of Respirators

Counterfeit and Altered Respirators: The Importance of NIOSH Certification

OSHA has produced a training video for healthcare employers and workers that explains the proper use of respirators and the procedures to follow to assure that respirators protect workers from airborne hazards in healthcare settings. The 33-minute video explains the major components of a respiratory protection program including fit-testing, medical evaluations, training and maintenance. The video also discusses the difference between respirators and surgical masks, features a segment on common respiratory hazards found in healthcare settings, and demonstrates how respirator use helps protect workers from exposure to airborne chemicals.

http://www.dol.gov/dol/media/webcast/20110112-respirators/

 

Safe Patient Handling

NIOSH post safe patient handling on the web. Overexertion incidents are the leading source of workers’ compensation claims and costs in healthcare settings. The primary outcome associated with such incidents are musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/safepatient/

 

Sharps:

Safe Disposal of Sharps Used Outside of Health Care Settings. Tips for disposing of sharps that are used at home. http://tinyurl.com/bvghwps

 

TB:

CDC, Division of Tuberculosis Elimination has released of the 5th edition of the Core Curriculum on Tuberculosis: What the Clinician Should Know.
http://www.cdc.gov/tb/education/corecurr/default.htm

Some of this info comes from the CDC and from the TB control person.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5417.pdf

1) MMWR From the Quality Control procedure checklist from CDC Prefilling syringes is not recommended. Tuberculine is absorbed in varying amounts by glass and plastic. To minimize reduction in potency, tuberculine should be administered as soon after the syringe has been filled as possible. I also spoke to the TB control person and she said each dose needs to be drawn up just before it is given. Bottom line: Draw it up in front of the patient and give it immediately, no prefilling.

2) MMWR: Tuberculin should be kept refrigerated.

This is from the TB control person: Tuberculin should not be kept in the door but in the main part of the refrigerator, not against the wall or near an air vent. If you are doing a clinic and you do not have a cooler, you can keep a cool pack on the table and place the vial in its box on top of the cool pack. Do not place the cool pack on top of the vial.

Refrigerators need daily temperature checks and need to be kept on a log.

3) MMWR: Tuberculin should be stored in the dark as much as possible.

TB Control person: After you draw up the tuberculine the vial should be returned to its box. It should be stored in the refrigerator in its box.

4) When can a TST be placed if other vaccines are also being administered (e.g., measles, varicella, yellow fever, and smallpox)? A TST should be administered either on the same day as vaccination with live virus or 4–6 weeks later. Vaccines that might cause a false-negative TST result are measles, varicella, yellow fever, smallpox, BCG, mumps, rubella, oral polio, oral typhoid, and live-attenuated influenza. This means you must ask if the have had Flu Mist

5) Should gloves be worn when placing TST? Specific CDC recommendations do not exist regarding this topic. If your local area indicates that universal precautions should be practiced with skin testing, the local areas should determine what precautions should be followed in their setting.

6) If an HCW in a setting has a latex allergy, should this person receive a TST? A person with a latex allergy can receive a TST when latex-free products are used. Latex allergy can be a contraindication to skin testing if the allergy is severe and the products used to perform the test (e.g., syringe plungers, PPD antigen bottle stopper, and gloves) contain latex. Latex-free products are, however, usually available. If a person with a latex allergy does have a TST performed using products or equipment that contain latex, interpretation of the TST results can be difficult, because the TST reaction might be the result of the latex allergy, reaction to PPD, or a combination of both. Consider repeating the TST using latex-free products or use BAMT.

7) Should the TST site be covered with an adhesive bandage? No, avoid covering the TST site with anything that might interfere with reading the TST result (e.g., adhesive bandages, cream, ointment, lotion, liquids, and medication).

 

Ticks:

For information on tick-borne diseases, including a tick-bite poster for outdoor workers, go to http://www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/TickBorneDiseases.aspx

 

Vaccines:

Before you order your flu vaccine follow Checklist for Safe Vaccine Storage and Handling http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3035.pdf

Pertussis vaccination information and resources. including recommendations, patient and staff handouts, and many other resources, visit http://www.immunize.org/pertussis

THE PINK BOOK provides healthcare professionals with comprehensive information on vaccine-preventable diseases.

Typical chapters include a description of the disease, clinical features, medical management, vaccine details, vaccination schedule and use, and more. TO DOWNLOAD THE PINK BOOK (FREE) http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/default.htm#download

FREE CNE: ONLINE COURSE ON VACCINE SAFETY AND PATIENT COMMUNICATION http://www.anaimmunize.org/Webcast

FREE CNE: Cholera Information for Healthcare Professionals
Cholera resources for healthcare professionals addressing diagnosis, testing, treatment, patient care, and prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/haiticholera/hc_professionals.htm

 

Wellness:

 

Healthy Living Calendars
2012 Healthy Living Calendars are one-page calendars that promote taking simple steps for a safe and healthy life. http://www.cdc.gov/family/calendar/

Sitting at Work is Harmful: 15 Ways to Fight Fatigue.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/8782/sitting-work-harmful-15-ways-fight-fatigue

 

Tool Kit on Workplace Health Promotion. http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/model/index.html

Great resources on Health Promotion in the workplace. http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/organizations/index.htm

Workplace health Potential interventions to be implemented and evaluation measures http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/healthtopics/index.html

BodyWorks is a community-based obesity prevention program designed to help parents and caregivers of adolescents improve family eating and activity behaviors.

BodyWorks is now offering FREE online trainings. http://www.womenshealth.gov/bodyworks/

The National Healthy Worksite Program is a CDC led initiative designed to assist employers in implementing science and practice-based prevention and wellness strategies that will lead to specific, measureable health outcomes to reduce chronic disease rates. For most employers, chronic diseases—such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, obesity, arthritis and diabetes—are among the most prevalent, costly, and preventable of all health problems.  The National Healthy Worksite Program seeks to promote good health through prevention, reduce chronic illness and disability, and improve productivity outcomes that contribute to employers’ competitiveness. http://www.cdc.gov/nationalhealthyworksite/

 

Veterans:

Screening tool for war veterans to assess traumatic brain injury

Mount Sinai School of Medicine has developed a screening tool for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). “Traumatic brain injury is underdiagnosed, and left untreated can have long-term cognitive, behavioral and physical effects,” The Brain Injury Screening Questionnaire (BISQ) is a web-based tool that allows users to anonymously answer a series of questions about whether they sustained a blow to the head in which they were unconscious or dazed, confused or disoriented. Their symptoms include sleep disturbances, irritability, memory disturbances, difficulties organizing daily tasks, and difficulty concentrating. At the end of the survey, participants receive a computer-generated report. Those who are found to be at risk are advised to seek further evaluation from a qualified health care professional. For more information visit http://www.mssm.edu/research/centers/traumatic-brain-injury-central.

 

Vision:

Prevent Blindness America® offers employers a Healthy Eyes Vision Wellness program to educate employees about preventing and treating eye-related problems and diseases. http://www.preventblindness.org/wellness/
For information on tick-borne diseases, including a tick-bite poster for outdoor workers, go to http://www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/TickBorneDiseases.aspx

 

 

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